4 Things You Have To Consider Before Hiring A Consumer Rights/Protection Lawyer

10 months ago by Martha Obike 176 Views


You should probably have a lucid idea of what your consumer rights are, what is customer law and what a consumer rights/protection can do for you. Are you still pretty unsure about your knowledge of these key areas? Head over and read our previous articles. Are you a consumer aware of your rights and your consumer rights were violated? Did you experience product fraud? credit fraud? false advertising? or identity theft? And you need a lawyer to represent you and fight against fraudulent business practices. However, before you hire a consumer rights/protection lawyer, here are 4 things you should consider first :

Ask For Recommendations

A lot of lawyers specializes in a specific branch of law. You have to ensure that the lawyer you are about to hire has the relevant and required skills and experience you need for your case. An attorney who regularly drafts business legal documents may not necessarily be the best choice to represent you in a courtroom if the subject is a product liability case. Get to know what kind of lawyer you are dealing with. Ask your friends, family or co-workers for recommendations for lawyers they have hired for similar cases like yours. Even better, check with your state and local bar associations. Some groups offer lawyer referral services for their members.

Your Level of Comfort With Your Lawyer

Before you finally decide on the particular lawyer you want to hire, do your research, book an initial meeting with the lawyer (also find out beforehand if you will be charged for this meeting), endeavor to talk to more than one lawyer before you choose which one would represent you. Describe your case in a clear concise summary. Find out the lawyers level of experience, how long they have been in practice, have they worked on cases similar to yours. Find out your options, the probability you have of winning your case, get comfortable with getting and communicating any information to your intended lawyer. Get comfortable with telling your lawyer your personal information, find out if the lawyer seems interested in your solving your case. Also, you should be comfortable with your lawyer's approach to your case.

Know Your Lawyer's Fees and Costs


Before you start any work, ask what the cost and fees will be for the lawyer's services and if you will have to pay for other fees and charges. Most state ethics rules require lawyers to charge a reasonable fee. For example, the American Bar Association advises that lawyers explain their fees, preferably in writing, within a reasonable time after beginning to represent you. And some state bars require that lawyers put their fees in writing before they take a case. Your lawyer may charge you extra for copying documents, courier services, court filing fees, or research services. Be sure you understand what you will be charged for and how much. Find out how your lawyer's fees are structured, is it an hourly or flat fee. Ensure the consumer lawyer estimate the cost of your case. Also look for the best balance of experience and cost and other alternatives methods of payment.


Contingency Fees

When you opt for a contingent fee arrangement, it means that your lawyer gets a percentage of whatever money you receive as a resolution of your case. If you receive no money, then your lawyer collects no fees. While this is a brilliant approach, however, you may have to pay charges for court fees, copying documents, and hiring expert witnesses. If you practically have very little money to pay hourly fees, it may be appropriate to negotiate a contingency fee with your consumer protection lawyer. But before agreeing to a contingent fee, keep in mind that you can always negotiate the size of a contingency fee, usually a percentage of any money you receive to resolve the case, and the size of the contingency fee you agree on, should reflect the amount of work that will be expected of your consumer protection lawyer.




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